Different heart rate zones for training goals

by | Jul 3, 2018 | All, endurance, Fitness, Get faster, Sprinting | 0 comments

Training at various heart rates can have huge impacts on your fitness.

Whether you’re a beginner looking to make quick improvements, at an academy trying to stand out or playing semi-professionally and on the cusp of making it, understanding your own unique heart rate training zones will have a huge effect on your progression.

SO WHAT ARE HEART RATE TRAINING ZONES?

We all know that the heart plays a key role in our fitness. What you may not know however, is that exactly how hard your heart is working during a training session will directly impact the benefits that each session achieves – and it isn’t always the harder you work, the greater the results.

Our training regimes can be split into two basic categories, aerobic and anaerobic training. Typically speaking, during aerobic training our body is able to intake sufficient oxygen in order to sustain the exercise that we’re completing. On the flip side, during anaerobic training our oxygen consumption is not great enough and our body is forced to draw energy from elsewhere in the body. This means that your body; and you guessed it, your heart, must work considerably harder to sustain the exercise even for short periods. You can find out all about aerobic vs anaerobic training in soccer here.

AEROBIC TRAINING ZONE FOR FAT BURNING

Our first heart rate zone is the “aerobic fat burning” zone.  At 50 – 75% of our heart rate reserve, our body should be able to intake adequate oxygen to sustain the exercise over a long period of time. This is the optimal training intensity to burn fat. At 50% of our heart rate reserve, we will not be testing our aerobic system enough to see benefits in our aerobic endurance.

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AEROBIC TRAINING ZONE FOR FITNESS

The next heart rate zone is the “aerobic fitness” zone. Pushing through 75% – 85% of our heart rate reserve, our body should still be able to intake adequate oxygen to sustain the exercise – however demand on the body is much greater than in the fat burning zone. This great demand causes our heart to work much harder in order to pump oxygenated blood to the muscles. It is at 75% – 85% of our heart rate reserve that our body learns to adapt and improve our lung capacity and VO2 max.

AEROBIC – ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD TRAINING ZONE

This zone is the maximum intensity of aerobic exercise that our body can tolerate before reaching anaerobic training. This training zone is perfect for conditioning and improving athletic performance. If you want to be running harder, fast and longer than your opponents, then this is the optimal training intensity for you.

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ANAEROBIC TRAINING ZONE

This is it, your “all out” training zone. Working at 90 – 100% of your heart rate reserve you’re exhausting your body’s oxygen reserves and forcing adaptations within the muscle. Typically on the training field this zone refers to quick, short, all out sprints which can only be sustained for a short amount of time. This is where you want to focus your training if your aim is to increase your top speed.

HOW DO I WORK OUT MY MAXIMUM HEART RATE & HEART RATE RESERVE

Using the above, I hope you will be able to tailor your training routines to maximize your goals. However, in order to efficiently work in each different training zone, you have to be able to accurately workout your Maximum Heart Rate and Heart Rate Reserve.

To easiest way to calculate your maximum heart rate is to subtract your age from 220. Therefore, if you’re 20 years old then your maximum heart rate is 200 beats per minute (220 – 20).

To calculate your heart rate reserve, simply subtract your resting heart rate (you can find out about your resting heart rate here) from your maximum heart rate. Using the example above, a 20 year old with a resting heart rate of 50 would have a heart rate reserve of 150 beats per minute (220 – 20 – 50).

Different heart rate zones for training goals

by | Jul 3, 2018 | All, endurance, Fitness, Get faster, Sprinting | 0 comments

Training at various heart rates can have huge impacts on your fitness.

Whether you’re a beginner looking to make quick improvements, at an academy trying to stand out or playing semi-professionally and on the cusp of making it, understanding your own unique heart rate training zones will have a huge effect on your progression.

SO WHAT ARE HEART RATE TRAINING ZONES?

We all know that the heart plays a key role in our fitness. What you may not know however, is that exactly how hard your heart is working during a training session will directly impact the benefits that each session achieves – and it isn’t always the harder you work, the greater the results.

Our training regimes can be split into two basic categories, aerobic and anaerobic training. Typically speaking, during aerobic training our body is able to intake sufficient oxygen in order to sustain the exercise that we’re completing. On the flip side, during anaerobic training our oxygen consumption is not great enough and our body is forced to draw energy from elsewhere in the body. This means that your body; and you guessed it, your heart, must work considerably harder to sustain the exercise even for short periods. You can find out all about aerobic vs anaerobic training in soccer here.

AEROBIC TRAINING ZONE FOR FAT BURNING

Our first heart rate zone is the “aerobic fat burning” zone.  At 50 – 75% of our heart rate reserve, our body should be able to intake adequate oxygen to sustain the exercise over a long period of time. This is the optimal training intensity to burn fat. At 50% of our heart rate reserve, we will not be testing our aerobic system enough to see benefits in our aerobic endurance.

AEROBIC TRAINING ZONE FOR FITNESS

The next heart rate zone is the “aerobic fitness” zone. Pushing through 75% – 85% of our heart rate reserve, our body should still be able to intake adequate oxygen to sustain the exercise – however demand on the body is much greater than in the fat burning zone. This great demand causes our heart to work much harder in order to pump oxygenated blood to the muscles. It is at 75% – 85% of our heart rate reserve that our body learns to adapt and improve our lung capacity and VO2 max.

AEROBIC – ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD TRAINING ZONE

This zone is the maximum intensity of aerobic exercise that our body can tolerate before reaching anaerobic training. This training zone is perfect for conditioning and improving athletic performance. If you want to be running harder, fast and longer than your opponents, then this is the optimal training intensity for you.

ANAEROBIC TRAINING ZONE

This is it, your “all out” training zone. Working at 90 – 100% of your heart rate reserve you’re exhausting your body’s oxygen reserves and forcing adaptations within the muscle. Typically on the training field this zone refers to quick, short, all out sprints which can only be sustained for a short amount of time. This is where you want to focus your training if your aim is to increase your top speed.

HOW DO I WORK OUT MY MAXIMUM HEART RATE & HEART RATE RESERVE

Using the above, I hope you will be able to tailor your training routines to maximize your goals. However, in order to efficiently work in each different training zone, you have to be able to accurately workout your Maximum Heart Rate and Heart Rate Reserve.

To easiest way to calculate your maximum heart rate is to subtract your age from 220. Therefore, if you’re 20 years old then your maximum heart rate is 200 beats per minute (220 – 20).

To calculate your heart rate reserve, simply subtract your resting heart rate (you can find out about your resting heart rate here) from your maximum heart rate. Using the example above, a 20 year old with a resting heart rate of 50 would have a heart rate reserve of 150 beats per minute (220 – 20 – 50).